HIS 1050 (AI)

American Civilization Since World War II (3 credits)


25644    002    Th    06:00PM - 08:45PM    01/11/10 - 05/04/10    0212   STAT 3.000  Jan 14

25912    004      T    06:00PM - 08:45PM    01/11/10 - 05/04/10    0243  MANO 3.000  Jan 12

Peter Friedlander  aa1971@wayne.edu

Office Hours: Weds 12:00 - 2:00 PM    3167 FAB

for students with disabilities that requires accommodations

University Policy regarding the H1N1 virus



narrative spine: Paul Boyer, Promises To Keep: The United States Since World War II


1945
━━━
1955━━━1965━━1975━━━1985━━━1995━━━2005━━2015

                  ↓                                                            ↓              ↓  
Three
Drill-
downs
                      Montgomery                                                                                     What's the         Dover Area
                          Bus Boycott
                                                                                    Matter With     School District
                                                                                                                                           Kansas        Memorandum
                                                                                                                                                                 Opinion




HIS 1050 (AI)
: American Civilization Since World War II


This course follows the development of American history, society, and culture since World War Two.  This period begins with a triumphant Keynesianism at the end of the War, but in retrospect could be characterized as a long reaction to the New Deal, from McCarthyism (1950-54), through the Goldwater campaign (which began the Southern transformation of the Republican Party) and the emergence of the New Right, including the forces associated with Nixon, Reagan, and the two Bushes.  

The elections of Carter and Clinton might seem to contradict this sweeping statement. But they are the exceptions that confirm (or test) the rule, Carter's victory coming on the heels of Watergate, while Clinton's represented a sharp shift to the right within the Democratic party in response to the rise of the New Right (as revealed in Clinton's support of "Welfare Reform").  Indeed, both Carter and Clinton were Southern Baptist governors.

(This long sweep of the right seemed to be stymied in the 2006 Congressional elections, and to have been delivered a further setback with the election of Barack Obama.  After a brief honeymoon the backlash to the election of a black man to the presidency took off, orchestated by the gop right and its business.  At this time who really knows . . . ?)

On the cultural front, dramatic changes in roles and values gave rise to insurgent movements of blacks, women, Chicanos, native American, and gays and lesbians; and to the anti-war and environmental movements.  These movements have been variously described as liberal, radical, and progressive.  Opposition to these movements took the form of a resurgence of an Evangelical (largely Anglo-Saxon) Christianity, allied with a growing Catholic oppositon to the liberalism of the Democratic Party. (The question of whether this right arose simply as a backlash in response to these developments is addressed in this course.)

The latest manifestation of this phenomenon, the challenge to Barack Obama's citizenship status, reveals the regional concentration of these forces, indicated by the chart to the right ("Percent Who Doubt Obama's Citizenship").

Society, viewed as economy plus social structure, underwent dramatic changes. Under the term globalization is subsumed a vast and far reaching transformation of international economics and related domestic socio-economic relations.  The two graphs to the right provide some insight into this impact of this process on American society.  The map below, "concentation of U. S. parts plants", has implications for the future of Middle America.

As I write this in early October 2009, it is apparent that our course will begin with

Congress embroiled in perhaps the most significant political fight in our post-war history, the struggle over health care reform, led by our first black President.  The course concludes with a close look at the election of Barack Obama and the issue of health care reform.

Basic narrative framework for orthogonal readings & drilldowns

Internet-accessed databases, including videos (CNBC, CNN, PBS), GIS Websites


cat
1.  My motto: there is no "Truth," only methods, perspectives, and databases. While this may be emotionally unsatisfying, from the standpoint of cognitive development it is the cat's meow.

2.  But there are also respected bodies of scholarship, established methods and disciplines, and an ever-expanding set of data bases that  are always implicated in any attempt at understanding.


course requrements: three essays (80 points)

1.  Montgomery Bus Boycott: an inter-textual analysis--30 points

2.  Dover culture wars: reading a court document: intra-textual analysis--20 points

3.  Campaign rallies (Youtube): reading the rallies throught the lenses of our
         texts--30 points

course requirements: two quizzes (10 points each)


2.  reading Frank


Attendance: missing 5 or more classes will result in an automatic drop








1.  levels of analysis; cognitive resolving power



2.  the symbolic more significant than material acts of brutality; the consequences for the cognitive development of the r*c*st more significant than the oppression of the other;

3.  why the terms fascism and racism should be abandoned

qustion of power paramount and foundational


quote Pacton × 3

but this on the cultural and the psycholgic al levels is identical to racism.  The only dfference is that fascism is racsm mobilized by unholy coalitiosn of resetient and provincialism, and miliarize.  On the other han, it seems that throughout much of its history that wolddescribe the southern states.  And, indeed, Paxton considers the KKK to be the firt terrist, fascist organiation in world hisory.

what is the sigle most important dimension of both phenomona is the manipuation of the mecaisms of defense by anti-modern mmilieu, incliding provincial and rentier indsturies.  At the core of history is the qustion of poer, not merly as seen in concetrted ecooic andmilary oer,  but even more mprtant than these is biopoer.


Understanding poltics requires seeing business below th level of the fortuen 1000; and noting

 the imporatnce of small town, provnicial bsiness in the gop

the role of pronical and neuveau capitals, allied with reneir caitals

READINGS

BOOKS (available at Marwil's Bookstore)

*Paul Boyer, Promises To Keep: The United States Since World War II (Wadsworth) $80

*Thomas Frank, What's the Matter with Kansas (Henry Holt & Co., 2004)





Montgomery Bus Boycott

David J. Garrow, Bearing the cross : Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (New York : Vintage Books, 1988, c1986)
chapter 1, Montgomery Bus Boycott

Lynn Olson, Freedom's Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830 to 1970 (Scribner, 2002)
"Preface"
chapter 5, "There Had to Be a Stopping Place"
chapter 6, "Our Leaders Us Just We Ourself"

Interview, "Montgomery Bus Boycott," Mrs. Jannice Chapital, April 9, 2002, guest speaker at Peter Friedlander's class, transcript.

Elizabeth Jacoway, "Taken by Surprise: Little Rock Business Leaders and Desegregation," in Elizabeth Jacoway and David R. Colburn, eds., Southern Businessmen and Desegregation (Louisiana State Univesity Press, 1982)

Reforming Jim Crow
Southern Politics and State in the Age Before Brown
Kimberley Johnson

COURSE PACK (available at Marwil's Bookstore)

Montgomery Bus Boycott 

David J. Garrow, Bearing the cross : Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (New York : Vintage Books, 1988, c1986)
chapter 1, Montgomery Bus Boycott

Lynn Olson, Freedom's Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830 to 1970 (Scribner, 2002)
"Preface"
chapter 5, "There Had to Be a Stopping Place"
chapter 6, "Our Leaders Us Just We Ourself" 

Interview, "Montgomery Bus Boycott," Mrs. Jannice Chapital, April 9, 2002, guest speaker  at Peter Friedlander's class, transcript. 



INTERNET-ACCESSIBLE TEXTS

John E. Jones III, United States District Judge, IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE MIDDLE DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA 
TAMMY KITZMILLER, et al. : Case No. 04cv2688:Plaintiffs
v. 
DOVER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT, et al.,: Defendants
MEMORANDUM OPINION, December 20, 2005 (139 pages, typed and triple-spaced) 


OTHER LINKS EMBEDDED IN SYLLABUS



A certain type of public is being shaped (semiosphere)

the people speak: Network- I'm Mad as Hell

semiotic web: A Face in the Crowd
   
1957 Face in the Crowd: progressive message in movie

A-Face-in-the-Crowd/overview  what major aspects of the film (as capture in the two clips above) does this overview fail to mention?  

from Casablanca ("Im shocked, shocked . . .")

the class struggle acording to Marx (wage slavery): from Duck Soup (scene starts at 3 minutes 30 seconds and runs to 4 minutes and 55 seconds)

Judith Butler

Recasting bourgeois Europe : stabilization in France, Germany, and Italy in the decade after World War I / Charles S. Maier.

racism (surely there's a better word, one not so harsh, not so grating on sensitive ears)


Organizations, Inter-organizational networks, and centers of power: the internet commands us to pay attention (Political Parties and)



The Demos (the object, not the source, of power)


from Irwin Ungar, Recent America: The United States Since 1945 (Pearson Education, Inc.)

At their July[1964] convention in San Francisco the [Republican] party's right wing triumphed over its moderates by nominating Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona.  Goldwater and his associates represented the conservative politics of the growing South and West.  Funded by "new money" derived from oil, timber, real estate, and cattle, the Republican right was unabashedly opposed to the social welfare system and the regulatory state derived from the New Deal.  It wished to reduce the federal government to what it had been before Roosevelt and the Great Depression.  p. 106

from Michael W. Miles, The Odyssey of the American Right (Oxford University Press, 1980)

below is one of only a few indespensible points of departure.  Others are Imus, KE in Second New Deal, Whitehouseforsale.org.  Latter is compulsory for contemporary and recent politics.

from Richard M. Freeland, The Truman Doctrine and the origins of McCarthyism: foreign policy, domestic politics, and internal security, 1946-1948  (New York University Press, 1985)


from Kim Phillips-Fein, Invisible Hands: the Making of the Conservative Movement from the New Deal to Reagan (W. W. Norton, 2009), pp. 142-3

 I.  also quote sociological description of non-elite, provincial, and small    
     business



II.  pp. 142-3

Failing to get support from businessmen in the months leading up to the [1964 Presidential] election, the Goldwater campaign decided to try a new tactic: finding ways to translate the conservative message into rhetoric that could mobilize working class voters.  Even though Goldwater's low-tax, non-union vision for economic growth won the support of some union members in Arizona, Cliff White [who conceived and masterminded the conservative dominance of the 1964 Republican National Convention and its nomination of Barry Goldwater for President] thought that his surveys about reactions to the civil rights movement indicated the potental for success with a different strategy--one that focused on fearrs of racial integration and on a broad call for morality in politics.

As the election approached, the New York offices of Citizens for Goldwater-Miller . . . saved a survey of forty white ethnic voters in Queens--mostly first- and second-generation Americans, some recent immigrants, mostly lower middle class--that a supporter sent into the office.  About half were for Goldwter and half either for Johnson or still undecided.  The issues the Goldwater supporters felt most strongly about were "rising crime" and "fear of integration"; even Johnson supporters were agitated about these problems.  Nearly everyone opposed busing children from one neighborhood to another to integrate the public schools.  "Most of those voting for Johnson thought Goldwater was right with respect to the 'racial issue,' but thought he was anti-union or would weaken social security," according to the survey.  The most striking aspect of the poll was the finding that the economic elements of the conservative program--"'right-to-work' and voluntary social security"--made an "almost universal negative impression" on the Queens voters.  But these cold be trumped if the Republicans changed their platform to capitalize on racial fears.  And that's eactly what the Goldwater supporter suggested.  "Signs should not simply read 'Vote Goldwater' but rather 'Make our neighborhood safe again.  Vote Goldwater.'  Or 'Streets must be made safe again.  Vote Goldwater' or 'Don't experiment with our children.  Keep neighborhood schools.  Vote Goldwater' or 'Our children want education--not transportation.  Vote Goldwater.'"

The letters coming into the Goldwater campaign offices from political allies and supporters made similar suggestions.  In September one political consultant wrote that on Long Island the busing program was known as the LBJ program, for "Let's Bus Juveniles," and suggested that "race riots" might sway New York City voters. Another Goldwater supporter, a Wall Streeter who wrote to the campaign while on a business flight, argued that "much more must be done to exploit the white backlash," saying that whites feared that "Negroes will move into their neighborhoods."  The white backlash, he declared, "was the biggest single reservoir of votes that Goldwater can tap into but you will have to get more to the point, if you are going to get these votes."

“The values of the weak prevail because the strong have taken them over as devices of leadership.” Nietzsche, Will to Power, § 863

Class Schedule & Reading Assignments

I.  United States and the Cold War


Week of:

Jan 11     Introduction to the Course

Network- I'm Mad as Hell (the people speak)

A Face in the Crowd (semiotic web)
   
Face in the Crowd (message in movie)

Friendly Fire: The Birth of an Anti-Kerry Ad, by Kate Zernike and Jim Rutenberg (New York Times, August 20, 2004)

VIDEO  Sick Around the World (PBS)

VIDEO French Health Care


PART ONE The American Century        1    (128)

Jan 18     CHAPTER 1 Crucible of Change: World War II and the Forging
of Modern America (31)

Jan 25     CHAPTER 2 "Not Since Rome and Carthage": Into the Cold War
(30)
Feb 4     CHAPTER 3 Uneasiness at Dawn: Domestic Trends in the Early
              Postwar Years (32)

Feb 11   CHAPTER 4 Modern Republicanism and Suburban Togetherness
in the 1950 (32)

PART TWO Dissent, Terror, Reform        129    (112)

Feb 18  CHAPTER 5 The Other Side of the Picture Window: Outsiders, Dissidents, and
Critics in the 1950's
(28)

CHAPTER 6 The Cold War Heats Up: From Sputnik to Vietnam
160    (25)

CHAPTER 7 The Liberal Hour
185    (29)

CHAPTER 8 The Civil-Rights Movement at Flood Tide
214    (27)

PART THREE The Loss of Innocence        241    (108)

CHAPTER 9 Radicalization: Black Power, the New Left, and the Counterculture
244    (19)

CHAPTER 10 Out of Control: War in Vietnam, Protest at Home
263    (28)

CHAPTER 11 1968 and the Nixon Years
291    (31)

CHAPTER 12 Reform in the Nation, Crisis in Washington
322    (27)

PART FOUR Setbacks, Achievements, New Dangers        349    (162)

CHAPTER 13 Picking Up the Pieces: Post-Watergate America
353    (31)

CHAPTER 14 Prime-Time Politics: The Reagan-Bush Years
384    (41)

CHAPTER 15 America at the Turn of the Century: Prosperity, Scandal, a Changing Society
425    (54)
CHAPTER 16 A Sea of Troubles, Glimmers of Promise, as a New Century Dawns
479    (32)


from cold war to war on terror



Political configurations in the cold war era: resources
 
Dean Acheson, Present at the Creation  

Martin Weil, A pretty good club : the founding fathers of the U.S. Foreign Service (Norton, 1978)

George Frost Kennan, "Overdue changes in our foreign policy," Harper's (August 1956)

Walter Issacson and Evan Thomas, The wise men: six friends and the world they made : Acheson, Bohlem, Harriman, Kennan, Lovett, McCloy (New York : Simon and Schuster, 1986)

Thomas W. Zeiler, Free trade, free world: the advent of GATT (Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1999

Zeiler, Thomas W.. "Tariff Policy." Encyclopedia of American Foreign Policy. The Gale Group Inc. 2002. Encyclopedia.com. 4 Aug. 2009 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

Michael W. Miles, The Odyssey of the American Right (Oxford University Press, 1980)

Richard M. Freeland, The Truman Doctrine and the origins of McCarthyism: foreign policy, domestic politics, and internal security, 1946-1948  (New York University Press, 1985)

William Preston, Jr., Aliens and dissenters : federal suppression of radicals, 1903-1933

Regin Schmidt,  Red scare  : FBI and the origins of anticommunism in the United States, 1919-1943 (Museum Tusculanum Press, University of Copenhagen, 2000) [electronic resource]

David Brion Davis, The fear of conspiracy; images of un-American subversion from the Revolution to the present (Cornell University Press, 1971)

Kim Phillips-Fein, Invisible Hands: the Making of the Conservative Movement from the New Deal to Reagan (W. W. Norton, 2009)

Friendly Fire: The Birth of an Anti-Kerry Ad, by Kate Zernike and Jim Rutenberg (New York Times, August 20, 2004)

William O. McCagg, Jr., Stalin embattled, 1943-1948 (Wayne State University Press, 1978)

Thomas G. Patterson, On Every Front: the making of the Cold War (Norton, 1979)

Don E. Carleton, Red scare! Right-wing hysteria, fifties fanaticism, and their legacy in Texas (Austin, Tex. : Texas Monthly Press, 1985)

The Alger Hiss Story  

Dan T. Carter, From George Wallace to New Gingrich: Race in the Conservative Counterrevolution, 1963-1994 (Louisiana State University Press, 1996)

Thomas B. Edsall, Building Red America: the New Conservatiove Coalition and the Drive for Permanent Power (Basic Books, 2006)






II.  Popular Insurgencies: The Montgomery Bus Boycott

Sept 29    The Civil Rights Movement and Black Insurgency


Zinn, The Twentieth Century, chapter 6, "'Or Does it Explode,'" pp. 182-212

VIDEO Eyes on the Prize: Awakenings, 1954-56 (transcript)

"Supreme Court of the United States, Brown v. Board of Education," HOT (119-123)

"Declaration of Constitutional Principles: The Southern Manifesto" (1956) HOT (124-27)

Anne Moody, "A Lunch-Counter Sit-In in Jackson, Mississippi" (1968) HOT (128-132)

William H. Chafe, "Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Voice of Radical Courage and Love,"  HOT (133-136)

Rustin, From Protest to Politics  HOT 137-146


Oct 1     The Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955-1956

COURSE PACK: Montgomery Bus Boycott  available at Kinko's (about $9.00)

"The Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955-1956," chapter 1 from David Garrow,  Bearing The Cross : Martin Luther King, Jr., And The Southern Christian Leadership Conference  New York : W. Morrow, 1986. (pp. 11-79)

Parks not seated alone in history  

boycott photos 


Oct 6    The Montgomery Bus Boycott continued: Discussion of Essay Assignment

"Preface," "There Had to Be a Stopping Place" and "Our Leaders Us Just We Ourself," chapters 5 and 6 from Freedom's Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830 to 1970, by Lynn Olson (Scribner, 2002)  pp. 13-17, 87-121 (n=37)

"Montgomery Bus Boycott," Mrs. Jannice Chapital, April 9, 2002, guest speaker  at Peter Friedlander's class, transcript. (10 pp.)

Black Residents Walking, Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955
from BlackPast.org



Study this photo closely.  What is present in the photo that is
absent in most accounts of the Boycott?


mont
Montgomery Alabama, 1920.  From U.S. Historical City Maps

III.  Popular Insurgencies: The Anti-War, Women's, and Gay Liberation Movements

Oct 8    Anti-War Dissent

Zinn, The Twentieth Century,  chapter 7, "The Impossible Victory: Vietnam" pp. 231-254  (re.  anti-war movement)

William H. Chafe, "Dump Johnson" HOT (239-250)

Lt. Gen. Harold G. More and Joseph L Galloway, "We were soldiers once, . . . and young" (HOT) 226-235)

John Kerry, "Vietnam Veterans Against the War," HOT (251-255)

Students for a Democratic Society, "March on Washington: The War Must Be Stopped," HOT (236-238)


Oct 13     Feminism and insurgent women

Zinn, The Twentieth Century, chapter 8, "Surprises," pp. 255-269

Sonia Sotomayor, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Co-op City, Bronx,
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nominee was 'scary smart' in high school, by Victor Tine, Newburyport News, May 27, 2009
  
Obama's Supreme Court pick Sonia Sotomayor never forgot her Bronx roots  by Michael Saul, New York Daily News, May 26, 2009

Supreme Change: As Sonia Sotomayor Strives for the High Court, Her Childhood Neighborhood No Longer Houses Opportunity
by Robin Shulman, Washington Post, June 16, 2009 

Judge Sonia Sotomayor's consideration for SCOTUS reminder there's more to boro than Stadium, blight, by Patrice O'Shaughnessy, New York Daily News | Bronx, May 26th 2009

Mark Naison: Sonia Sotomayor's Appointment Highlights a Time When Public Housing Was a Place of Hope and Possibility for Working Class Families in the Bronx, History News Network (click on second link)


Oct 15     other insurgenicies

Zinn, The Twentieth Century, chapter 8, "Surprises," pp. 269-300

F. Arturo Rosales, "Chicano!"  HOT (151-158)

Indians of All Tribes, "Proclamaton" (1969)  HOT (159-162)

Jane Sherron De Hart, "The Creation of a Feminist Conscousness," HOT (166-172)

optional  The Lordstown Struggle And the Real Crisis in Production, by Ken Weller

optional  The League of Revolutionary Black Workers (A Historical Study), by A.Muhammad Ahmad


Oct 20  First paper due (Montgomery Bus Boycott)


IV.  To the Right: the Rise of the New Conservatism


Oct 20    origins of the new right
        
Peter Schrag, "The Forgotten American (1969) HOT (287-299) 13

                    Dan Carter, "The Politics of Anger, 1963-1968 HOT (336-354) 19            
          Lisa McGirr, "Piety and Property: Conservatism and Right-Wing
Movements in the Twentieth Century"  HOT (355-370) 16

David Farber, "Taken Hostage," HOT (312-324) 13


Oct 22     the seventies

Zinn, The Twentieth Century, chapter 9, "The Seventies: Under Control?"  301-327

William C. Berman, "America's Right Turn," HOT (379-385) 

E.J. Dionne, Jr., "The Religious Right and the New Republican Party," HOT (371-378) 

Hecklers Taunt 200 in a March Against Racism  
By MARK A. UHLIG, New York Times, September 21, 1987

Racism Comes Home: The Howard Beach Case  (Queens Tribune, [re Dec. 20, 1986 ]


Oct 27     Zinn: ch. 10, Carter-Reagan-Bush: the Bipartisan Consensus (48 pp.)

Oct 29     Zinn: ch. 13, The Clinton Presidency, pp. 426-465

Nov 3     anti-evolution movement in Dover, Pa

John E. Jones III, United States District Judge
IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
FOR THE MIDDLE DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA 
TAMMY KITZMILLER, et al. : Case No. 04cv2688:Plaintiffs
v. 
DOVER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT, et al.,: Defendants
MEMORANDUM OPINION, December 20, 2005 (139 pages, typed and triple-spaced) 



culture and class

V.  To the Right: What's the Matter with Kansas
Pat Buchanan delivers his most famous address to the 1992 Republican National Convention. This battle cry for conservatives is a timeless classic.


Nov 5      Frank, What's the Matter with Kansas, pp. 1-77

Nov 10    Frank, What's the Matter with Kansas, pp. 78-137

Nov 12    Frank, What's the Matter with Kansas, pp. 138-190

Nov 17    Frank, What's the Matter with Kansas, pp. 191-251
What's the Matter With Kansas?, review by Owen Williamson

Review of Thomas Frank's What's the Matter with Kansas?, By Jonathan Rees

What's the Matter with Kansas?: How Conservatives Won the Heart of America Amazon.com: browse the comments!

How the Democrats lost the heartland.  Thomas Frank talks about why Middle America, once a bastion of left-wing populism, has become red-state Republican. By Andrew O'Hehir

Downwardly mobile and picking up speed
Once radical flyover county now votes against its own interests, frank says

reviewed by Paul Buhl (Sanfrancisco Chronicle june 20 2004)

How the Other Half Votes, by GEORGE SCIALABBA May 27, 2004 This article appeared in the June 14, 2004 edition of The Nation.
Nov 19 Second Paper Due  

VI.   institutional forces in the conservative mobilization

Nov 19    institutional forces in right moblization

Quiz #2 on Frank, What's the Matter with Kansas 

Kim Phillips-Fein, Invisible Hands: the Making of the Conservative Movement from the New Deal to Reagan (W. W. Norton, 2009), "Introduction," pp. ix-xii. & excerpt at right

Joseph E. Lowndes, From the New Deal to the New Right : race and the southern origins of modern conservatism (Yale University Press, 2008), chapter 1, "Beyond the Backlash Thesis," pp. 1-10

Friendly Fire: The Birth of an Anti-Kerry Ad, by Kate Zernike and Jim Rutenberg (New York Times, August 20, 2004)

Last gasp of the left? Two chapters from
Zinn:

Zinn, The Twentieth Century, chapter 11 "The Unreported Resistance" 

Zinn, The Twentieth Century, chapter 12, "The Coming Revolt of the Guards" (a populist sociology 99% people vs. 1% Establishment)


Nov 24    the war in Iraq & the Bush Administration

Zinn, The Twentieth Century, ch. 14, "The 2000 Election and the war on "terrorism" 466-475

The War Within, excerpts
By Bob Woodward
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, September 7, 2008; Page A01

No administration willingly puts its disagreements on display, but what happened in Washington during 2006 went beyond the usual give-and-take of government. The level of distrust became so severe that Bush eventually activated a back channel to Casey's replacement in Iraq, Gen. David H. Petraeus, circumventing the established chain of command. While the violence in Iraq skyrocketed to unnerving levels, a second front in the war raged at home, fought at the highest levels of the White House, the Pentagon, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the State Depart ment.

Gonzales Hospital Episode Detailed
Ailing Ashcroft Pressured on Spy Program, Former Deputy Says
by Dan Eggen and Paul Kane, Washington Post  May 16, 2007

Ron Suskind, "Why Are These Men Laughing?" ( ESQUIRE, JANUARY 2003) key term: Mayberry Machiavellis

A PBS NewsHour with Jim Jehrer Transcript of interview of Ron Suskind by Ray Suarez re Ron Suskind's, The Price of Loyalty: George W. Bush, the White House, and the Education of Paul O'Neill (Simon & Schuster, 2004)

from Wikipedia:

"Mayberry Machiavelli" is a satirically pejorative phrase coined by John J. DiIulio Jr., Ph.D., a former Bush administration staffer who ran President Bush's Faithbased Initiative. After he quickly resigned from his White House post in late 2001, DiIulio told journalist Ron Suskind, describing the administration of the Bush White House as published in Esquire: "What you've got is everything--and I mean everything--being run by the political arm. It's the reign of the Mayberry Machiavellis."
The phrase is meant to invoke infamous Machiavellian style power politics coupled with a sense of incompetent regional backwardness as supposedly exemplified by the fictional rural town of Mayberry, R.F.D., from The Andy Griffith Show, which ran on CBS, an American television network, from 1960 - 1968.  

Interrogation Methods Criticized  (New York Tmes, 5-30-07)

Justice Expands Internal Attorney Probe  (Washington Post 5-30-07)

Justice Dept. Expands Probe To Include Hiring Practices (Washington Post 5-30-07)

How Many More Mike Browns are out There? (Time 9-24-05)

*Official: Cheney Urged Wiretaps (Washington Post 6-7-07)

*Immigration Judges Often Picked Based On GOP Ties (Washington Post 6-11-07)

Suskind: Bush ordered fake letter linking Iraq to 9/11 The Raw Story

Book says White House ordered forgery
  Politico

Ex-Press Aide Writes That Bush Misled U.S. on Iraq
, by Michael D. Shear (Washington Post, May 28, 2008)





Arno J. Mayer, Dynamics of Counterrevolution in Europe,
1870 —1956 (Harper Torchbooks, 1971.  Emphasis added.)

"Clauswitz does not see war as a continuation of diplomacy--that is, of interstate relations--by other--that is, violent means.  Significantly, he invariably opts for the comprehensive concept of politics, which subsumes diplomacy, thus leaving open the possibility that recourse to war can be not only influenced but, in some instances, even determined by internal political considerations."  p. 136

"Here, then, is the paradox.  Whereas wars whose motivation and intent are primarily diplomatic and external retain their political purposes, as conceived by Clauswitz, those whose mainsprings are essentially political and internal fail to acquire a well-defined project." p. 138

"As for wars of primarily partisan and internal dynamic, they are decided by political actors and classes whose political tenure and social position tend to be insecure and whose latttiude for foreign policy decision tends to be circumscribed.  Precisely because their internal influence and control are tenuous, these actors and classes are inclined to have recourse to external war which, if successful, promises to shore up ther faltering positions. . . .  at the outset even the minimal external objectives  of wars that are sparked internally have a tendency to be singularly ill-defined."  p. 138



Internal Causes and Purposes of War in Europe, 1870-1956: A Research Assignment, Arno J. Mayer, The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 41, No. 3 (Sep., 1969), pp. 292-303


Anatol Lieven, America Right or Wrong: An Anatomy of American Nationalism (Oxford University Press, 2005), p. 8

America is the home of by far the most deep, widespread and conservative religious belief in the Western world, including a section possessed by wild millenarian hopes, fears and hatreds—and these two phenomena are intimately related. . .  [A]t the start of the twenty first century the United States as a whole is much closer to the developing world in terms of religious belief than to the industrialized countries (although a majority of believers in the United States are not fundamentalist Protestants but Catholics and “mainline,” more liberal Protestants).

Robert O. Paxton, The Anatomy of Fascism (Alfred A. Knopf, 2004) 

"The legitimation of violence against a demonized internal enemy brings us close to the heart of fascism."  p. 84


from Wikipedia

"Mayberry Machiavelli" is a satirically pejorative phrase coined by John J. DiIulio Jr., Ph.D., a former Bush administration staffer who ran President Bush's Faithbased Initiative. After he quickly resigned from his White House post in late 2001, DiIulio told journalist Ron Suskind, describing the administration of the Bush White House as published in Esquire: "What you've got is everything--and I mean everything--being run by the political arm. It's the reign of the Mayberry Machiavellis."

The phrase is meant to invoke infamous Machiavellian style power politics coupled with a sense of incompetent regional backwardness as supposedly exemplified by the fictional rural town of Mayberry, R.F.D., from The Andy Griffith Show, which ran on CBS, an American television network, from 1960 - 1968.  


from CNN, 4:00 to 6:00 PM, 9-15-07: pro- and anti-war demonstrators' signs

pro-war demo signs:        "Traitors Go to Hell!"
                                        "Deport Anti-war Protesters!"
                                        "Treason!"

anti-war demo signs:      "End the War Now!"
                                       "U.S. Out of Iraq!"
                                       "Support the Troops!  End the War!"

 on CNN 4:00 to 6:00 PM, 9-15-07

consider these conflicting slogans in relation to rabids and thoughtfuls (insert chart)

Ex-Press Aide Writes That Bush Misled U.S. on Iraq

By Michael D. Shear
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, May 28, 2008; Page A01

Former White House press secretary Scott McClellan writes in a new memoir that the Iraq war was sold to the American people with a sophisticated "political propaganda campaign" led by President Bush and aimed at "manipulating sources of public opinion" and "downplaying the major reason for going to war."
   .   .   .   .   .

"McClellan stops short of saying that Bush purposely lied about his reasons for invading Iraq, writing that he and his subordinates were not "employing out-and-out deception" to make their case for war in 2002.

"But in a chapter titled "Selling the War," he alleges that the administration repeatedly shaded the truth and that Bush "managed the crisis in a way that almost guaranteed that the use of force would become the only feasible option."

""Over that summer of 2002," he writes, "top Bush aides had outlined a strategy for carefully orchestrating the coming campaign to aggressively sell the war. . . . In the permanent campaign era, it was all about manipulating sources of public opinion to the president's advantage."

The Path to War: A Marxbrothersian perspective Marx I
      this continues with the next link,              Marx II  





VII.  From Bush to Obama


Nov 26 No class--thanksgiving

Dec 1  the campaigns of barack obama: Who were those white people
                 who voted for Obama?



The Emerging Democrtic Majority (Scribner, 2002) , "Introduction: the Politics of Postindustrial America," pp. 1-9

Eric P. Kaufmann, The Rise and Fall of Anglo-America (Harvard University Press, 2004), Introduction, pp. 1-7

Thomas B. Edsall, Building Red America: the New Conservatiove Coalition and the Drive for Permanent Power (Basic Books, 2006), Preface and part of Chapter 1, "Democratic Party Weaknesses Have Magnified Republican Party Advantages," pp. 1-19

Democrats Win Bigger Share of Religious Vote, by Alan Cooperman
Washington Post, November 11, 2006

The Questions That Defined the Election, Washington Post, November 12, 2006

Elections 2006, University of Michigan Documents Center

United States House of Representatives elections, 2006 Wiki

United States Senate elections, 2006  Wiki

United States elections, 2006  Wiki

Questions for Dr. Retail, by David Brooks (New York Times 2-8-08)
This article is about the class and cultural conflict between Clinton and Obama constituencies.  Compare it to the above reading.

The Party of Yesterday, By TIMOTHY EGAN, NYT, October 26, 2008

Inside Obama's Sweeping Victory Pew Forum November 5, 2008

Voting Religiously   Pew Forum November 5, 2008

Obama's Problem with White Voters  
March 21, 2008 By James Edmund Pennington, American Thinker, Sept. 7, 2008

Race and the Union Vote  By Salena Zito  September 21, 2008  Copyright 2008, Real Clear Politics   Salena Zito is a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review editorial page columnist.

Is Obama safe from 'hidden white vote?'  
Chicago tribune web page  Posted February 7, 2007 3:51 PM

Racist Incidents Give Some Obama Campaigners Pause (news story)

Election 2008: Racist Incidents Rattle Obama Backers    (transcript of online discussion with Merida)
by Kevin Merida, Washington Post Staff Writer, Tuesday, May 13, 2008; Page A01
exit polls
--------------------------

Barack Obama 2004 DNC Speech Part 1  

Barack Obama 2004 DNC Speech Part 2  


Dec 3     the demonization of barack obama

Observing the McCain Palin crowd behavior:

citizen videos & journalistic accounts  (N=18+)  ━━━━━━➤        
             
"NY Times' Stolberg, MSNBC's Matthews cited Tony Perkins, GOP conservatives as espousing "ethics" and "values,"" mediamatters.org, Aug 29, 2007

"CBS Evening News, ABC's World News failed to note Imus' history of racially charged insults"
mediamatters.org, April 10, 2007.  Read the comments!

"It's not just Imus", mediamatters.org, april 12, 2007

The Push to ‘Otherize’ Obama  By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF: (New York Times) September 20, 2008

A Cultural Geography of the United States and Canada  Click on religion.  These are incredible maps.  From Geography 200, Prof. Jon T. Kilpinen, Valparaiso University

Dec 8  the election of barack obama: money and elite influence

"Who business is betting on", By Nina Easton, Washington bureau chief (Fortune, June 26 2007)

Big Donors Among Obama's Grass Roots: 'Bundlers' Have a Voice in Campaign  By Matthew Mosk and Alec MacGillis, Washington Post Friday, April 11, 2008

In Fine Print, a Proliferation of Large Donors, By MICHAEL LUO and GRIFF PALMER
Published: October 20, 2008 (NYT)

Big Donors Drive Obama's Money Edge
, By Matthew Mosk and Sarah Cohen, Washington Post  October 22, 2008

Memo Gives Canada’s Account of Obama Campaign’s Meeting on Nafta, By MICHAEL LUO, Published: March 4, 2008 (NYT)

The Memo: REPORT ON US ELECTIONS - CHICAGO Meeting with Obama Advisor Austan Goolsbee  

 What A President Obama's Cabinet Might Look Like? Mark Nickolas, Posted October 1, 2008; in Huffington Post, Oct. 29, 2008
  
Harsh Words About Obama? Never Mind Now  
By JIM RUTENBERG
Published: November 8, 2008






December 10-22, Third Paper Due



Dec 10     health care (last class meeting)

VIDEO  Sick Around the World (PBS)

VIDEO French Health Care  

An excerpt from correspondent T.R. Reid's upcoming book on international health care, titled We're Number 37!,

Posts by John Geyman, MD: Physicians for a National Health Program Website; also xxx skips nhpw page

The Common Interest: Is it time for national health insurance?
by John Geyman (Boston Review)

Campaign Desk — July 13, 2009 10:58 AM
Health Care in France—and in America
A journalist’s observations
By Trudy Lieberman

HEALTH CARE UNDER FRENCH NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE by Victor G. Rodwin and Simone Sandier, in Health Affairs: the Policy Journal of the Health Sphere

April 17, 2009, 7:02 AM
Health Reform Without a Public Plan: The German Model
By UWE E. REINHARDT  NYT

The Swiss Menace,  August 16, 2009, NYT
By PAUL KRUGMAN


Dec 15        Study day

Dec 16-22  Finals
 
 
Observing the McCain Palin crowd behavior




citizen videos


The Sidewalk to Nowhere, McCain Supporters in Bethlehem, PA,  

The McCain-Palin Mob

Part 2 - The McCain-Palin Mob in Strongsville, Ohio

McCain Supporter Rants About Obama the Hooligan  (I'm Mad, I'm really mad)

McCain Tries to Tame Flames He Earlier Fanned  (Scared . . . Arab)

Racism at John McCain Rally--Denver, CO, Oct 24

Anger, Fear and Racism Follow Palin Rally (Oct 21) A group of 10-20 Obama backers gathered in front of Henderson Pavilion'sgates during Gov. Sarah Palin's speech. As McCain/Palin supporters exited the rally, many became enraged at the sight of the protest.

More Rightwing Hatred at Sarah Palin Rally in Henderson, Nevada (near Las Vegas)

Sarah Palin Rally Causes Confrontation with Obama Supporters  Sarah Palin Supporters confront Obama Supporters after a Palin rally on October 21st, 2008. One supporter of Palin suggests that Obama could be the antichrist. Then some guy picks up horse feces, calls it Obama, and throws it at Barrett.

Hatred, Ignorance and Racism on Display Outside a Palin Rally in Ohio   Oct. 19, 2008

More Hatred at a Palin Rally in Johnstown, PA  (Oct 11)

Redneck lady disses Obama    Sept 30

Morning Joe's "troubling" report about liberal elitists from the Upper West Side by Rumproast    Daily Kos, Oct 31, 2008   This is a bold attempt to smear liberals.  Compare the rhetoric of 1 thru 11 with that of 12.  

RINO [Republicans In Name Only] American Traitor Rep. Mike Castle Tap-Dances Around Obama Birth Certificate (July 20, 2009)

Right Wingers Wreak Havoc on Philadelphia Town Meeting, by Denise Dennis, Posted: August 3, 2009 10:09 AM  Huffington Post

Right-Wing Harassment Strategy Against Dems Detailed In Memo: ‘Yell,’ ‘Stand Up And Shout Out,’ ‘Rattle Him’  By Lee Fang on Jul 31st, 2009 at 2:28 pm, thinkprogress.org

Here come the health care attacks, August 3, 4:47 PM

Town halls gone wild,  Politico.com  By ALEX ISENSTADT    | 7/31/09 4:30 AM EDT Updated: 8/3/09 1:06 PM EDT

TIM BISHOP PROTEST, SETAUKET, NY (part one)

Temperatures rise at health-care meeting, By Jane M. Von Bergen, Posted on Mon, Aug. 3, 2009, Philadelphia Inquirer


 journalistic accounts

Unleashed, Palin Makes a Pit Bull Look Tame  
By Dana Milbank
Tuesday, October 7, 2008; Page A03

Anger Is Crowd's Overarching Emotion at McCain Rally  
By Michael D. Shear and Perry Bacon Jr.
Washington Post Staff Writers
Friday, October 10, 2008; Page A04

McCain-Palin Supporters Gone Wild, By LIZ GANNES, GigaOm, October 10, 2008,  New York Times

Panic attacks: Voters unload at GOP rallies, Politico.com

In Ex-Steel City, Voters Deny Race Plays a Role By Paul Vitellon
New York Times, April 4, 2008 (The rhetorical maneuvers of
blue collar whites)  

A Tip for The GOP: Look Away, By Kathleen Parker, Washington Post, August 5, 2009

Does DeLay's Angry Quadriplegic Town Hall Protesters Tale Add Up?
By Justin Elliott - August 20, 2009, 4:25PM Talking Points Memo


On Terrorist release, Scotland

Open season on MacAskill after Megrahi’s release  the herald (scotland)
IAIN MacWHIRTER    August 24 2009

Father still seeking Lockerbie truth after 20 years
 teleraph (uk)
WSU Policy guideline for higher education issued August 20, 2009, by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

“Those with flu-like illness should stay away from classes and limit interactions with other people (called “self-isolation”), except to seek medical care, for at least 24 hours after they no longer have a fever, or signs of a fever, without the use of fever-reducing medicines. They should stay away from others during this time period even if they are taking antiviral drugs for treatment of the flu.”

Because social distancing and isolation are crucial in preventing the spread of H1N1, we cannot expect students with flu symptoms to attend class.  Moreover,  students may have a  challenging time receiving a written excuse from a health provider.  As you review course syllabi with students, please spend sufficient time discussing your policies on class attendance and excused absences against the backdrop of a potential H1N1 outbreak.

Students with flu symptoms will be expected to balance their academic responsibilities with the social responsibility to self-isolate and not attend class or other public gatherings if they are sick.  In return, students should expect their instructors to demonstrate reasonable flexibility in the enforcement of written policies on class attendance and excused absences.




for students with disabilities that requires accommodations

If you have a documented disability that requires accommodations, you will need to register with Student Disability Services for coordination of your academic accommodations.  The Student Disability Services (SDS) office is located at 1600 David Adamany Undergraduate Library in the Student Academic Success Services department.  SDS telephone number is 313-577-1851 or 313-577-3365 (TDD only).  Once you have your accommodations in place, I will be glad to meet with you privately during my office hours to discuss your special needs.  Student Disability Services’ mission is to assist the university in creating an accessible community where students with disabilities have an equal opportunity to fully participate in their educational experience at Wayne State University.