Comment on reading and the UAW (4 panels)


Martyn Lyons, A History of Reading and Writing In the Western World (PalgraveMacmillan, 2010)

 9. The Reading Fever, 1750-1830 Everyone in Paris is reading . . .  People read while riding in carriages  or taking walks . . . Women, children, journeymen and apprentices read in shops.  On Sundays people read while seated at the front of their houses; lackeys read on their back seats, coachmen up on their boxes, and soldiers keeping guard.

10. The Age of the Mass Reading Public Between the 1830s and the First World War . . . a mass reading public came into existence.

11. New Readers and Reading Cultures The half century between the 1880s and the 1930s was the golden age of the book in the West. . . . Between the 1830s and the First World War . . . a mass reading public came into existence.


h

the UAW (Unity caucus*): Bildungsproletarians and Plebeian Upstarts: Intersubjectivity, Shared Intentionality, and the Extended Mind uu
the UAW, 1933-1943: a working notebook

the absent masses
three ratios
a. plebeian upstarts

1. the Joe Adams ratio:      10.6%  (Dodge Main) PF
2. the Charlie Yaeger ratio:  7.2%
  (Buick) Skeels
3. the Bud Simons ratio:     7.5%  (Fisher Body) Skeels, p. 16

b. bildunsproletarians: 0.1 %, or ≈ one in a thousand:

Dodge Main: 2 ratios (21,894 members in fall 1939)

n=13 (0.06%). Meeting of the Chrysler executive boards and shop
                      committees, Nov. 7, 1939

n=34 (0.16%). Emergency Meeting of Chrysler Executive Boards and 
                        Shop Committees October 8, 1939


c. the Paul Silver/John Anderson triangulation: locals 410, 238, and 350


UAW 1933-1943: Networks of Power
jj

Implicit in Fig. 0 is a critique of what I call, with some trepidation, the Cartesian idiocy of modern discourse.
link: cartesian